Pacific Wild (@pacificwild)

Pacific Wild
@pacificwild

978 Posts 97,308 Followers 476 Following

Working to protect the wildlife and wild spaces of Canada's Great Bear Rainforest and beyond. **New initiative #saveBCbears @ savebcbears.org **

https://pacificwild.org/about/employment/development-director-pacific-wild

Photos and Videos by @pacificwild

Today on Remembrance Day in Canada, we are honouring Canada’s veterans and fallen soldiers. We are also remembering a little black bear cub and honouring the human-animal bond. Most people don’t realize that the famous character from the children's story, “Winnie-the-Pooh”, started with a real-life black bear from Winnipeg, Canada. When WW1 broke out in 1914, veterinarian and soldier Doctor Harry Colebourn offered his services to his country. Bound for Quebec, Harry rescued a seven-month-old black bear cub in White River, Ontario, whose mother had been shot by a hunter. Named after the City of Winnipeg, "Winnie" the bear cub ended up going to war with Harry aboard the S.S. Manitou heading for England. The little cub became an unofficial regimental mascot in England, where she was loved by the troops for her gentle and playful nature. But when Harry was told that he will be sent to the front lines in Europe, he donated Winnie to the @zsllondonzoo where she was loved by children from around the world. "There is something you must always remember," Harry said. "It's the most important thing, really. Even if we're apart, I'll always love you. You'll always be my Bear." - From the book "Finding Winnie” by @lindsaymattick, when Harry takes Winnie to her new home. Ultimately, this little bear cub inspired #aamilne's character, Winnie-the-Pooh, and is a story of how animals have long provided people with ways of imagining their own place in the world.
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Video by @pacificwild of a black bear cub in the #greatbearrainforest. Swipe for original photos from 1914, courtesy of Lindsay Mattick @harpercollinsus @harpercollinsca @lindsaymariestewart 
@stanford @susanreaton_geo @ryerson_u @iantmcallister  @cbckidsca #winniethepooh #rememberanceday #blackbear #cub #WW1 #lestweforget #rememberthefallen #remberanceday2017

Today on Remembrance Day in Canada, we are honouring Canada’s veterans and fallen soldiers. We are also remembering a little black bear cub and honouring the human-animal bond. Most people don’t realize that the famous character from the children's story, “Winnie-the-Pooh”, started with a real-life black bear from Winnipeg, Canada. When WW1 broke out in 1914, veterinarian and soldier Doctor Harry Colebourn offered his services to his country. Bound for Quebec, Harry rescued a seven-month-old black bear cub in White River, Ontario, whose mother had been shot by a hunter. Named after the City of Winnipeg, "Winnie" the bear cub ended up going to war with Harry aboard the S.S. Manitou heading for England. The little cub became an unofficial regimental mascot in England, where she was loved by the troops for her gentle and playful nature. But when Harry was told that he will be sent to the front lines in Europe, he donated Winnie to the @zsllondonzoo  where she was loved by children from around the world. "There is something you must always remember," Harry said. "It's the most important thing, really. Even if we're apart, I'll always love you. You'll always be my Bear." - From the book "Finding Winnie” by @lindsaymattick , when Harry takes Winnie to her new home. Ultimately, this little bear cub inspired #aamilne 's character, Winnie-the-Pooh, and is a story of how animals have long provided people with ways of imagining their own place in the world. . . . . Video by @pacificwild  of a black bear cub in the #greatbearrainforest . Swipe for original photos from 1914, courtesy of Lindsay Mattick @harpercollinsus  @harpercollinsca  @lindsaymariestewart  @stanford  @susanreaton_geo  @ryerson_u  @iantmcallister  @cbckidsca  #winniethepooh  #rememberanceday  #blackbear  #cub  #WW1  #lestweforget  #rememberthefallen  #remberanceday2017 

We're hiring! Apply now. Pacific Wild is seeking an experienced Development Director to design and execute a successful fundraising strategy to support our work to protect wildlife and their habitat in the Great Bear Rainforest. Do you have a passion for fundraising? Are you a great writer and collaborator who enjoys connecting with philanthropists and activists alike? We are looking for the right candidate to handle a diverse set of development tasks for our non-profit, from innovative fundraising campaigns and events, to grant writing and donor tracking. 
To view the full job description click the link in our profile or visit: pacificwild.org/about/employment
Tag anyone you think might be interested.
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#bears #wolves #orcas #salmon #marinelife #conservation #job #environment #employment #bc #cndpoli #bcpoli #fundraising #hire #development

We're hiring! Apply now. Pacific Wild is seeking an experienced Development Director to design and execute a successful fundraising strategy to support our work to protect wildlife and their habitat in the Great Bear Rainforest. Do you have a passion for fundraising? Are you a great writer and collaborator who enjoys connecting with philanthropists and activists alike? We are looking for the right candidate to handle a diverse set of development tasks for our non-profit, from innovative fundraising campaigns and events, to grant writing and donor tracking. To view the full job description click the link in our profile or visit: pacificwild.org/about/employment Tag anyone you think might be interested. . . . . #bears  #wolves  #orcas  #salmon  #marinelife  #conservation  #job  #environment  #employment  #bc  #cndpoli  #bcpoli  #fundraising  #hire  #development 

THANK YOU to everyone who wrote letters last week to the proposed regulation changes required to implement the ban for grizzly bear hunting. We had 1,000 letters sent in through pacificwild.org during the last 48 hours alone! One of @PacificWild's team members joined the many other voices to tell the government that B.C. needs a full ban on all grizzly bear hunting to protect this vulnerable species. This relates to the call for a ban on black bear hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest as well, because those black bears killed for "sport" could be carrying the recessive gene that gives rise to Spirit bear cubs. Click the link in our bio to read the full letter by our Programs Coordinator, Krista Roessingh, as she touches on her personal experiences. "It seems we have not learned much since the annihilation of the buffalo, the big whales, the sea otter, and now the mountain caribou, salmon, herring and eulachon. As stewards of B.C.'s wildlife and crown lands, you cannot just go on allowing people to kill, log, road, mine, and pollute everything. You need to take a stand and turn things around before it's really too late. I believe that most British Columbians will be there to support you if you do it right."
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Photo by @iantmcallister #savebcbears #greatbearrainforest #spiritbear #stopthetrophyhunt #grizzly #blackbear #kermode

THANK YOU to everyone who wrote letters last week to the proposed regulation changes required to implement the ban for grizzly bear hunting. We had 1,000 letters sent in through pacificwild.org during the last 48 hours alone! One of @PacificWild 's team members joined the many other voices to tell the government that B.C. needs a full ban on all grizzly bear hunting to protect this vulnerable species. This relates to the call for a ban on black bear hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest as well, because those black bears killed for "sport" could be carrying the recessive gene that gives rise to Spirit bear cubs. Click the link in our bio to read the full letter by our Programs Coordinator, Krista Roessingh, as she touches on her personal experiences. "It seems we have not learned much since the annihilation of the buffalo, the big whales, the sea otter, and now the mountain caribou, salmon, herring and eulachon. As stewards of B.C.'s wildlife and crown lands, you cannot just go on allowing people to kill, log, road, mine, and pollute everything. You need to take a stand and turn things around before it's really too late. I believe that most British Columbians will be there to support you if you do it right." . . . . Photo by @iantmcallister  #savebcbears  #greatbearrainforest  #spiritbear  #stopthetrophyhunt  #grizzly  #blackbear  #kermode 

Please join us in asking the B.C. government to close the loophole that allows grizzly bears to be killed "for meat". The B.C. government will stop all hunting of grizzly bears in the Great Bear Rainforest and end trophy hunting of grizzly bears throughout the rest of the province effective November 30th. But the decision allows continued grizzly bear hunting outside of the Great Bear Rainforest, under the pretext of hunting for meat. 
Today is the last day to add your voice to these proposed regulations. Please take a moment to tell the government that B.C. needs a full ban on all grizzly bear hunting to protect this vulnerable species. Link in header. Thank you!! #SAVEBCBEARS Photo by @iantmcallister #grizzlybear #publicinputmatters

Please join us in asking the B.C. government to close the loophole that allows grizzly bears to be killed "for meat". The B.C. government will stop all hunting of grizzly bears in the Great Bear Rainforest and end trophy hunting of grizzly bears throughout the rest of the province effective November 30th. But the decision allows continued grizzly bear hunting outside of the Great Bear Rainforest, under the pretext of hunting for meat. Today is the last day to add your voice to these proposed regulations. Please take a moment to tell the government that B.C. needs a full ban on all grizzly bear hunting to protect this vulnerable species. Link in header. Thank you!! #SAVEBCBEARS  Photo by @iantmcallister  #grizzlybear  #publicinputmatters 

Grizzly bears need your help. Today is the second last day for British Columbians to provide input on the proposed grizzly bear hunt-regulations by the B.C. government. The catch? The consultation is about how to manage the meat hunt, not if there should even be a meat hunt. 
The more you learn about bear populations in B.C., the more appalling the idea of any form of grizzly hunting becomes - whether it is for their head, paws and hide, or for their meat. Bears are vulnerable to population decline and B.C.'s grizzly population has fallen from an estimated 35,000 bears in the early 1900s to as low as six thousand today. Now’s the time to let the Canadian authorities know that all killing must end before B.C.’s bears are pushed to the brink of extinction. Click on the link in our profile to add your voice to Pacific Wild's letter today. No hunting of grizzly bears for trophy or for meat! #SAVEBCBEARS 
Photo by @iantmcallister #cubs #family

Grizzly bears need your help. Today is the second last day for British Columbians to provide input on the proposed grizzly bear hunt-regulations by the B.C. government. The catch? The consultation is about how to manage the meat hunt, not if there should even be a meat hunt. The more you learn about bear populations in B.C., the more appalling the idea of any form of grizzly hunting becomes - whether it is for their head, paws and hide, or for their meat. Bears are vulnerable to population decline and B.C.'s grizzly population has fallen from an estimated 35,000 bears in the early 1900s to as low as six thousand today. Now’s the time to let the Canadian authorities know that all killing must end before B.C.’s bears are pushed to the brink of extinction. Click on the link in our profile to add your voice to Pacific Wild's letter today. No hunting of grizzly bears for trophy or for meat! #SAVEBCBEARS  Photo by @iantmcallister  #cubs  #family 

While Canada and the U.S. have their own conservation battles, many of the issues overlap on the coast as marine mammals and apex predators do not heed political boundaries and often pass through neighbourly waters or forest. 
But we can learn from one another in many ways. On the Pacific coast in Washington state for example, there's a strict law forcing boats to stay almost 200 metres away from the whales at all times. In Canada the limit is 100 metres and it’s a guideline, not a requirement.
However, at long last, Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc says there will be regulations in place before the spring to ensure no boat comes within at least 100 metres away from all marine mammals and 200 metres away from killer whales.
More needs to be done to both protect and help recovery efforts of marine mammals in Canadian waters. Currently, all four populations of killer whales found in B.C. waters, as well as fin whales and humpback whales, are recognized under the federal Species at Risk Act. Northern resident, Bigg’s (transient), and offshore killer whales, fin whales, and humpback whales are listed as “threatened,” while southern resident killer whales are listed as “endangered.” They face a large number of human-caused threats, including lack of prey, ship strikes, aquatic pollution, warming waters due to climate change, as well as potential impacts from fishing practices and tanker projects. Noise from large ships and whale-watching tour boats is another large threat to whales as it disturbs their ability to use sound to find food - we welcome this new proposed regulation and look forward to seeing more change to help protect marine mammals.
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Photo by @iantmcallister #pnw #20by2020 #oilspill #ourocean2017 #OurWild #orca #killerwhale #noisepollution #whalewatching

While Canada and the U.S. have their own conservation battles, many of the issues overlap on the coast as marine mammals and apex predators do not heed political boundaries and often pass through neighbourly waters or forest. But we can learn from one another in many ways. On the Pacific coast in Washington state for example, there's a strict law forcing boats to stay almost 200 metres away from the whales at all times. In Canada the limit is 100 metres and it’s a guideline, not a requirement. However, at long last, Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc says there will be regulations in place before the spring to ensure no boat comes within at least 100 metres away from all marine mammals and 200 metres away from killer whales. More needs to be done to both protect and help recovery efforts of marine mammals in Canadian waters. Currently, all four populations of killer whales found in B.C. waters, as well as fin whales and humpback whales, are recognized under the federal Species at Risk Act. Northern resident, Bigg’s (transient), and offshore killer whales, fin whales, and humpback whales are listed as “threatened,” while southern resident killer whales are listed as “endangered.” They face a large number of human-caused threats, including lack of prey, ship strikes, aquatic pollution, warming waters due to climate change, as well as potential impacts from fishing practices and tanker projects. Noise from large ships and whale-watching tour boats is another large threat to whales as it disturbs their ability to use sound to find food - we welcome this new proposed regulation and look forward to seeing more change to help protect marine mammals. . . . . Photo by @iantmcallister  #pnw  #20by2020  #oilspill  #ourocean2017  #OurWild  #orca  #killerwhale  #noisepollution  #whalewatching 

Here's some good news: The federal government has met its target for protecting 5% of Canada’s oceans by 2017, including several areas yet to be fully designated. A 140,000km2 area off the west coast of Vancouver Island containing many seamounts and hydrothermal vents that support an abundance of ocean life will receive interim protection in the form of closures to all bottom-contact fishing in approximately 60% of the total area. This will protect corals, sponges, and their sensitive seafloor habitats from damage. As one heckler commented, it’s a bit like saying you cleaned up 5% of your room – but we commend those in government, as well as conservationists, First Nations, and others who are working hard to make real progress on ocean protection. 
Photo by @iantmcallister #marineprotectedarea #pacificnorthwest #Coast #cogovernance #oceanfeedstherainforest #20by2020 #coralbouquet

Here's some good news: The federal government has met its target for protecting 5% of Canada’s oceans by 2017, including several areas yet to be fully designated. A 140,000km2 area off the west coast of Vancouver Island containing many seamounts and hydrothermal vents that support an abundance of ocean life will receive interim protection in the form of closures to all bottom-contact fishing in approximately 60% of the total area. This will protect corals, sponges, and their sensitive seafloor habitats from damage. As one heckler commented, it’s a bit like saying you cleaned up 5% of your room – but we commend those in government, as well as conservationists, First Nations, and others who are working hard to make real progress on ocean protection. Photo by @iantmcallister  #marineprotectedarea  #pacificnorthwest  #Coast  #cogovernance  #oceanfeedstherainforest  #20by2020  #coralbouquet 

Conservationists vindicated in a new damning report by the Auditor General of British Columbia. "We found that the ministries haven’t fulfilled many of their commitments, including a grizzly bear management plan and the implementation of a recovery plan in the North Cascades. Also absent was an inventory and monitoring strategy of grizzly bears in B.C. and clear policies for bear viewing." Human expansion has also resulted in increased illegal killing of grizzly bears, and greater human-bear conflicts. Yet, the long-promised legislation that could address these risks are not yet in place. Our criticism over the last two decades on BC's ability to conserve grizzly bears is supported in this report and more. The Ministries’ management of grizzly bears did not meet expectations. The lack of effectiveness of grizzly bear management in this province is clearly evident and we need to see immediate and proactive change, starting with a full ban on grizzly bear hunting. Send in your letter advocating for change to the government now at the link in our profile -- all you have to do is add your name!

#SAVEBCBEARS 
Photo by @iantmcallister

Conservationists vindicated in a new damning report by the Auditor General of British Columbia. "We found that the ministries haven’t fulfilled many of their commitments, including a grizzly bear management plan and the implementation of a recovery plan in the North Cascades. Also absent was an inventory and monitoring strategy of grizzly bears in B.C. and clear policies for bear viewing." Human expansion has also resulted in increased illegal killing of grizzly bears, and greater human-bear conflicts. Yet, the long-promised legislation that could address these risks are not yet in place. Our criticism over the last two decades on BC's ability to conserve grizzly bears is supported in this report and more. The Ministries’ management of grizzly bears did not meet expectations. The lack of effectiveness of grizzly bear management in this province is clearly evident and we need to see immediate and proactive change, starting with a full ban on grizzly bear hunting. Send in your letter advocating for change to the government now at the link in our profile -- all you have to do is add your name! #SAVEBCBEARS  Photo by @iantmcallister 

A soggy afternoon for a Kermode and black bear in the #GreatBearRainforest. The rare Kermode or "Spirit" bear in the foreground is one of only a few hundred in the world and found almost exclusively in the densely forested islands of this region. Triggered by the same recessive gene associated with red hair and fair skin in humans, this cream or white bear is actually a white variant of a black bear. Both of these bears depend on the fall salmon runs for their final meals before their winter hibernation, which can be up to seven months long. However, the number of returning wild salmon has declined drastically over the years and we are seeing new visitors encroaching on Spirit and black bear territory in search of more food: grizzly bears. Grizzlies and black bears coexist everywhere except the smaller islands of the Great Bear Rainforest, causing age-old systems to change. "There's not enough habitat for grizzlies on those smaller islands. They need big grassy estuaries, subalpine habitat, and an enormous home range, which those islands don't offer," says Thomas Reimchen, a biologist at @universityofvictoria, @natgeo. Another reason we need to protect this incredibly interconnected ecosystem, from bears to the salmon that nourishes them. 
#oceanfeedstherainforest #pacificwild #spiritbear #kermode #blackbear #grizzlybear 
Photo by @iantmcallister

A soggy afternoon for a Kermode and black bear in the #GreatBearRainforest . The rare Kermode or "Spirit" bear in the foreground is one of only a few hundred in the world and found almost exclusively in the densely forested islands of this region. Triggered by the same recessive gene associated with red hair and fair skin in humans, this cream or white bear is actually a white variant of a black bear. Both of these bears depend on the fall salmon runs for their final meals before their winter hibernation, which can be up to seven months long. However, the number of returning wild salmon has declined drastically over the years and we are seeing new visitors encroaching on Spirit and black bear territory in search of more food: grizzly bears. Grizzlies and black bears coexist everywhere except the smaller islands of the Great Bear Rainforest, causing age-old systems to change. "There's not enough habitat for grizzlies on those smaller islands. They need big grassy estuaries, subalpine habitat, and an enormous home range, which those islands don't offer," says Thomas Reimchen, a biologist at @universityofvictoria , @natgeo.  Another reason we need to protect this incredibly interconnected ecosystem, from bears to the salmon that nourishes them. #oceanfeedstherainforest  #pacificwild  #spiritbear  #kermode  #blackbear  #grizzlybear  Photo by @iantmcallister 

British Columbians are being given the opportunity to provide input on the proposed grizzly bear hunt-regulations until November 2nd. But the consultation is about how to manage the meat hunt, not if there should even be a meat hunt. The long-term survival of grizzly bears in this province is at risk if we do not act now. Your voice is needed. The new meat-hunt policy fails to address the long-term conservation of grizzly bears and the acknowledgement of the majority of First Nations and B.C. residents who wish to see a complete end to the hunt. All you have to do is add your name to the letter template on our website at pacificwild.org to help us push for a total and complete ban of grizzly bear hunting -- no hunting for trophy or for meat!! #SAVEBCBEARS 
Photo by @iantmcallister

British Columbians are being given the opportunity to provide input on the proposed grizzly bear hunt-regulations until November 2nd. But the consultation is about how to manage the meat hunt, not if there should even be a meat hunt. The long-term survival of grizzly bears in this province is at risk if we do not act now. Your voice is needed. The new meat-hunt policy fails to address the long-term conservation of grizzly bears and the acknowledgement of the majority of First Nations and B.C. residents who wish to see a complete end to the hunt. All you have to do is add your name to the letter template on our website at pacificwild.org to help us push for a total and complete ban of grizzly bear hunting -- no hunting for trophy or for meat!! #SAVEBCBEARS  Photo by @iantmcallister 

The salmon run is currently peaking in the cool fall waters of the Great Bear Rainforest. Proper protection of wild salmon and their habitats, from the open ocean to upriver spawning grounds, benefit many species and ecosystems. Yet despite Premier Horgan recognizing the importance of wild salmon and being committed to its protection, there's been no mention of specific measures to protect and rebuild salmon stocks on the Pacific coast. We need your help to phase out open net fish farms in migratory routes -- head to pacificwild.org to send a letter into the government now. Wild salmon are under direct threat from current government policies. We need to see measures taken to combat climate change and enforce habitat protection and restoration, pollution control, and better regulation and enforcement of salmon and other fisheries, and salmon aquaculture. 
Photo by @iantmcallister #salmon #DFO #Fisheries #fishfarmsgetout #wildsalmon

The salmon run is currently peaking in the cool fall waters of the Great Bear Rainforest. Proper protection of wild salmon and their habitats, from the open ocean to upriver spawning grounds, benefit many species and ecosystems. Yet despite Premier Horgan recognizing the importance of wild salmon and being committed to its protection, there's been no mention of specific measures to protect and rebuild salmon stocks on the Pacific coast. We need your help to phase out open net fish farms in migratory routes -- head to pacificwild.org to send a letter into the government now. Wild salmon are under direct threat from current government policies. We need to see measures taken to combat climate change and enforce habitat protection and restoration, pollution control, and better regulation and enforcement of salmon and other fisheries, and salmon aquaculture. Photo by @iantmcallister  #salmon  #DFO  #Fisheries  #fishfarmsgetout  #wildsalmon 

A view of two worlds: these two split shots show very different things above and under the surface of the ocean. The ever-changing interface between land and sea is what defines the #pacificnorthwest perhaps more than anything else. At times it can be stormy grey skies meeting cold, clear waters, or sea-green tones of the forests edge blending with salty ocean waves. But last fall it was diesel fuel and heavy oil that covered the sea floor and saturated shellfish beds.
This week marks the one-year anniversary of the oil spill in the Seaforth channel in #Heiltsuk traditional territory of Bella Bella.
Today, an entire year later, the Heiltsuk Nation have had to open a legal case on the lack of post-spill recovery - one that seeks to recover damages and challenge the "world class oil spill response."
“The oil spill continues to be a catastrophic injury to our food sources, culture, and economy,” says Heiltsuk Tribal Council Chief Councillor, Marilyn Slett. Head to the link in our profile to read the full release about how the government of British Columbia and Kirby Corporation have been unwilling to meet Heiltsuk requests for comprehensive post-spill research or a health impact assessment to date.
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First photo by @iantmcallister second photo of #nathanestewart by @tavishcampbell  #greatbearsea #cdnpoli #ourocean2017 #blueeconomy #oilspill the

A view of two worlds: these two split shots show very different things above and under the surface of the ocean. The ever-changing interface between land and sea is what defines the #pacificnorthwest  perhaps more than anything else. At times it can be stormy grey skies meeting cold, clear waters, or sea-green tones of the forests edge blending with salty ocean waves. But last fall it was diesel fuel and heavy oil that covered the sea floor and saturated shellfish beds. This week marks the one-year anniversary of the oil spill in the Seaforth channel in #Heiltsuk  traditional territory of Bella Bella. Today, an entire year later, the Heiltsuk Nation have had to open a legal case on the lack of post-spill recovery - one that seeks to recover damages and challenge the "world class oil spill response." “The oil spill continues to be a catastrophic injury to our food sources, culture, and economy,” says Heiltsuk Tribal Council Chief Councillor, Marilyn Slett. Head to the link in our profile to read the full release about how the government of British Columbia and Kirby Corporation have been unwilling to meet Heiltsuk requests for comprehensive post-spill research or a health impact assessment to date. . . . . First photo by @iantmcallister  second photo of #nathanestewart  by @tavishcampbell  #greatbearsea  #cdnpoli  #ourocean2017  #blueeconomy  #oilspill  the

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